If you're missing "Girls" check out "Love" on Netflix

While I saw every episode of Girls on HBO I didn't love it nor did I relate to it.  My 20s looked nothing like that but also my 20's were so long ago maybe I don't remember them correctly.

 Photo courtesy of Vanity Fair

Photo courtesy of Vanity Fair

Hannah was annoying but I related to her as a professional writer. Marnie riddled with issues I couldn't pinpoint. Shoshanna was just plain weird. Jessa never seemed to fit in with the group. *sigh*  I didn't want to miss out on the movement. Instead, I feel like I want those hours of my life back.

I binged on some Netflix "Love" over the weekend and found it gave off a similar coming of age vibe as "Girls" but it's both sexes, not just women, and full of just as much dysfunction, a circle of friends dynamic, blunders through dating and self-discovery. It all takes place in the  polarizing world of Los Angeles and the entertainment industry which is pretty much the only industry if you live in the city of angels. A little "Girls" crossover, Mimi Rose played by beauty Gillian Jacobs, is the lead female in "Love" and  Leslie Arfin writes episodes of "Love" as well as some episodes of "Girls." 

SPECIAL NOTE:  A gem of comedy gold throughout the seasons from Jordan Rock who you will notice instantly is the younger brother of Chris Rock.  He fancies himself a Yoda of wisdom and an ambitious caterer doing Kraft services. Everyone has a part to play in Hollywood. Sometimes you're a stuntman, sometimes you're an on-set tutor and sometimes you're a child star supporting your parents.  Someone has to feed these fine people.

Judd Apatow clearly has his signature on this series and we even get some treats from John Slattery of "Mad Men" fame directing a few episodes.  Off the cuff witty laugh out loud lines, insights to the world of Hollywood, an oddball group of friends - none of which are annoying and the challenges they face as they come into their 30s in career, self-awareness, and love.

 Photo courtesy of Netflix

Photo courtesy of Netflix

It seems everyone in Hollywood is seeing a therapist. I mean, you have to be a little off your rocker to work in that industry, right? Healthy well-adjusted people don't make good tv. We see this in reality shows too. Many "Love" characters reference therapists and lead female Mickey even works for a hack of a radio love therapist who himself is in therapy.  Lead characters Mickey and lovable Gus can't help but be drawn to each other despite endless bumps in the road. You will root for both of them even when they flub up.   They are not the only lovable messes, the whole cast is.

This show leaves me with thoughts of: Do we ever come of age or do we just shift into different periods of life where our focuses change as we learn, experiment, grow and expand our horizons? Does everyone come of age?   We're all on different paths and go at our own pace where the comparison is the thief of joy-which we see several characters doing to themselves throughout the 3 seasons currently available.

Netflix continues to do great things.